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Medication

Shachi says

It's easy to find out whether mental stress affects your glucose control. Before checking your glucose levels, write down a number rating your mental stress level on a scale of 1 to 10. Then write down your glucose level next to it. After a week or two, look for a pattern. Drawing a graph may help you see trends better. Do high-stress levels often occur with high glucose levels and low-stress levels with low glucose levels? If so, stress may affect your glucose control. Here are some ways we can reduce reducing mental stresses: 1) Making Changes You may be able to get rid of some stresses of life. If you get stressed by traffic, see if you can find a new route to work or leave home early enough to miss the traffic jams. If your job drives you crazy, see if there the troublesome aspects can be handled by somebody else. If you are at odds with a friend or relative, you can make the first move to patch things up. For such problems, stress may be a sign that something needs to change. 2) Relaxation For some people with diabetes, controlling stress with relaxation therapy seems to help, though it is more likely to help people with type 2 diabetes than people with type 1 diabetes. This difference makes sense. Stress blocks the body from releasing insulin in people with type 2 diabetes, so cutting stress may be more helpful for these people. People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin, so stress reduction doesn't have this effect. Some people with type 2 diabetes may also be more sensitive to some of the stress hormones. Relaxing can help by blunting this sensitivity. Here are some ways you can help yourself relax: Breathing exercises Sit or lie down and uncross your legs and arms. Take in a deep breath. Then push out as much air as you can. Breathe in and out again, this time relaxing your muscles on purpose while breathing out. Keep breathing and relaxing for 5 to 20 minutes at a time. Do the breathing exercises at least once a day. Exercise: Another way to relax your body is by moving it through a wide range of motion. Three ways to loosen up through movement are circling, stretching, and shaking parts of your body. To make this exercise more fun, move with the music. Replace bad thoughts with good ones: Each time you notice a bad thought, purposefully think of something that makes you happy or proud. Or memorize a poem, prayer, or quote and use it to replace a bad thought. Whatever method you choose to relax, practice it. Just as it takes weeks or months of practice to learn a new sport, it takes practice to learn relaxation.
It's easy to find out whether mental stress affects your glucose control. Before checking your glucose levels, write down a number rating your mental stress level on a scale of 1 to 10. Then write down your glucose level next to it. After a week or two, look for a pattern. Drawing a graph may help you see trends better. Do high-stress levels often occur with high glucose levels and low-stress... (Read More)
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Shachi says

If you already eat healthfully, exercise and have a normal body weight, or if you are already doing everything you can to live a healthy lifestyle, there is not much point in waiting to start medication. If you have repeatedly been counseled to make those changes but have not, it is probably appropriate to start medication unless there is reason to believe this time will be different. If you have very high blood sugars, , lifestyle changes alone are probably not going to make enough difference, and medicine should be started.On the other hand, if the glucose elevations are only modest, perhaps with an A1c in the high sixes or low sevens, and there is good reason to think the person will make significant lifestyle changes, I often will give him or her the chance to turn things around without medication. Here is an important thing to remember, though: Starting any medication does not make you dependent on it. Even if you start medicine and are successful in making needed lifestyle changes, there is a good possibility you can reduce or stop the medication, so you do not lose any ground by going on the medication right away.
If you already eat healthfully, exercise and have a normal body weight, or if you are already doing everything you can to live a healthy lifestyle, there is not much point in waiting to start medication. If you have repeatedly been counseled to make those changes but have not, it is probably appropriate to start medication unless there is reason to believe this time will be different. If you... (Read More)
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Shachi says

Insulin Injections Pros Injections require less education and training than pump therapy. “Using a pump requires professional training and close diabetes management.” Injection therapy is cheaper than pump therapy. Cons Low blood glucose levels can occur because you may be using different types of insulin. Frequent injections mean you may develop resistant areas of the body where insulin will not absorb properly. Insulin Pump Pros The pump delivers insulin continuously throughout the day, causing fewer sudden highs and lows in blood glucose levels. Insulin delivery is more accurate and precise. There will be less needle sticks. You may have one injection (hook up) every three days versus 15-18 injections in a three-day period with injection therapy. Adjusting your own insulin allows a more flexible lifestyle. Cons Pump supplies are expensive.
Insulin Injections Pros Injections require less education and training than pump therapy. “Using a pump requires professional training and close diabetes management.” Injection therapy is cheaper than pump therapy. Cons Low blood glucose levels can occur because you may be using different types of insulin. Frequent injections mean you may develop resistant areas of the body where insulin will... (Read More)
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