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Deeksha Khare says

It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Gestational Diabetes is a condition in which pregnant females get high blood glucose levels. It is caused by improper insulin responses. During pregnancy, the placenta - the organ that feeds and delivers oxygen to your baby -- releases hormones that help your baby grow. Some of these hormones interfere with mother's insulin and prevent it from functioning properly, thus leading to a rise in blood glucose levels.
Doctors theorize that genetic predisposition, environmental issues (such as obesity prior to pregnancy), and/or behavioral factors (such as diet and exercise habits) may contribute. Although the condition can strike any pregnant woman, there are several risk factors that could increase your chances of developing this disease if:
- You were overweight before you got pregnant and you are gaining weight very quickly during your pregnancy. Extra weight makes it harder for your body to use insulin.
- You have a family history of diabetes (parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes)
- You had pre-diabetes before pregnancy (blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes)
- You had gestational diabetes during a past pregnancy
- You have a history of unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth
- You are over the age of 25
- You gave birth to a baby weighing more than 4kg
- You have a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
- You have high blood pressure

It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Gestational Diabetes is a condition in which pregnant females get high blood glucose levels. It is caused by improper insulin responses. During pregnancy, the placenta - the organ that feeds and delivers oxygen to your baby -- releases hormones that help your baby grow. Some of these hormones interfere with...

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Deeksha Khare says

Age above 45. Overweight or obesity. A family history of diabetes. Women who are African-American, Native-American, Native Alaskan, Hispanic, Asian-American, or Native Hawaiian are more prone to be at high risk. Previous child with a birth weight of more than 9 pounds. Had gestational diabetes. Have hypertension or high blood pressure. Have hypercholesterolemia or high cholesterol. Exercise less than 3 times a week. History of heart disease or stroke.
Age above 45. Overweight or obesity. A family history of diabetes. Women who are African-American, Native-American, Native Alaskan, Hispanic, Asian-American, or Native Hawaiian are more prone to be at high risk. Previous child with a birth weight of more than 9 pounds. Had gestational diabetes. Have hypertension or high blood pressure. Have hypercholesterolemia or high cholesterol. Exercise... (Read More)
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Deeksha Khare says

Hypoglycemia is the condition of having too little glucose in the blood, usually below 70 mg/dl. It can result from taking too much insulin, not eating, illness or excessive exercise. Physical changes include shakiness, sweating, chills and feeling clammy, increased heart rate, dizziness, blurred vision, headache, weakness or excessive fatigue, tingling and numbness in the lips or tongue, lack of coordination, nausea and, in worst cases, seizures and unconsciousness.
Hypoglycemia is the condition of having too little glucose in the blood, usually below 70 mg/dl. It can result from taking too much insulin, not eating, illness or excessive exercise. Physical changes include shakiness, sweating, chills and feeling clammy, increased heart rate, dizziness, blurred vision, headache, weakness or excessive fatigue, tingling and numbness in the lips or tongue, lack... (Read More)
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Shachi says

People with diabetes, have to deal with many complications. Some of these complications can be easily managed or avoided by controlling blood sugar levels. Constipation is more common in people with diabetes. According to the study, poor blood sugar control over a long period of time increased the likelihood and frequency of constipation. Natural solutions for constipation relief involve changes in your eating, diet, nutrition and physical activity· -Drink liquids throughout the day including double toned milk, buttermilk, lemon water, light tea/coffee, green tea, coconut water, soup. Avoid taking sugar in them. -Eat more fruits and vegetables​. Include at least 1-2 servings of fruits in your daily diet along with the good serving of whole vegetables in the form of salad, always start your meals with a big bowl of salad· -Eat more fiber. These include whole fruits and vegetables, oats, whole cereals, flaxseeds etc.· -Exercise. Try to get some physical activity every day to stay regular. To help prevent and relieve constipation, make exercise a regular part of your routine. Aim for 30 minutes of aerobic exercise per day, at least five days a week. Diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. High blood glucose makes your blood sludgy due to slow circulation which results in the cells not getting the oxygen and nutrients they need.Low sugars levels also cause fatigue. Lifstyle changes you should look at are: Stop smoking and alcoholism Start yoga, meditation, and physical exercises· Maintain a healthy weight · Reduce stress· Take proper sleep.
People with diabetes, have to deal with many complications. Some of these complications can be easily managed or avoided by controlling blood sugar levels. Constipation is more common in people with diabetes. According to the study, poor blood sugar control over a long period of time increased the likelihood and frequency of constipation. Natural solutions for constipation relief involve... (Read More)
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Shachi says

Insulin resistance is a condition that raises your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. When you have insulin resistance, your body has problems using insulin. Over time, this makes your blood glucose (sugar) levels go up. The good news is that cutting calories, being active, and losing weight can reverse insulin resistance and lower your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. What does insulin do? Insulin helps your body use glucose for energy. When you eat, your body breaks food down into glucose and sends it into the blood. Then, insulin helps move the glucose from the blood into your cells. When you have insulin resistance, your body can’t use insulin properly. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin make up for it. But, over time your body isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin keep your blood glucose at normal levels. If your blood glucose gets too high, you may have either prediabetes or diabetes. What raises your risk for insulin resistance? You are at risk if you • are overweight • are physically inactive • have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes • are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander • have polycystic ovary syndrome, also called PCOS • have had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy • have given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kgs • are age 45 or older • have had above-normal blood glucose levels • have high blood pressure • have low HDL (good) cholesterol • have high levels of blood fats called triglycerides • have had heart disease, a stroke, or disease of the blood vessels in your neck or legs. Some of these risk factors also raise your risk for heart disease. How can you prevent or reverse insulin resistance? You can eat fewer calories and be physically active. If you do, it’s more likely you’ll lose weight. Studies have shown that losing even 7% of your weight, may help. Eat less ❏Eat smaller serving sizes. ❏Order the smallest serving size when eating out—or share your main dish.❏Try calorie-free drinks or water instead of regular soft drinks and juice. ❏Choose baked, grilled, and steamed foods instead of fried. ❏Use a smaller plate❏Fill half your plate with greens and veggies. Fill ¼ with meat or other protein, and ¼ with carbs, such as brown rice or whole grain roti. ❏Eat more vegetables, whole grains, and fruit. ❏Use nonstick pans or cooking sprays. ❏Cut back on high-fat toppings, such as butter, margarine, sour cream, regular salad dressing, mayonnaise, and gravy. Instead, season foods with barbecue sauce, salsa, lemon juice, or other low-fat options. ❏Eat small servings of low-calorie, low-fat snacks. Be physically active ❏Get up and move every 90 minutes if you sit for long periods of time. ❏Take the stairs instead of the elevator. ❏Walk around while you talk on the phone or during TV commercials. ❏Find an activity you enjoy, such as dancing,gardening, or playing with the kids. Move more around the house. For example, clean the house, work in the garden, or wash the car. ❏Take the dog for a walk. ❏Park at the far end of the parking lot and walk to the store. ❏Walk every day, working up to 30 minutes of brisk walking, 5 days a week—or split the 30 minutes into two-15 or three-10 minute walks. ❏Try strength training by lifting light weights 2 to 3 times a week.
Insulin resistance is a condition that raises your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. When you have insulin resistance, your body has problems using insulin. Over time, this makes your blood glucose (sugar) levels go up. The good news is that cutting calories, being active, and losing weight can reverse insulin resistance and lower your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. What... (Read More)
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