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Shachi says

The extent to which you and your physician prepare for your operation depends on the extent of the severity of the condition that has led to it, and the treatment that you are taking for your diabetes. The fact that your operation is planned means that it is not urgent nor an emergency. Your diabetes may increase your risk for problems during or after your surgery, such as infection after surgery or healing slower. However, in recent years, studies have shown that very careful management of the blood sugar is very important in the days before and following an operation. In general, your surgeon will request assurance from the medical doctor caring for your diabetes that your blood sugar is under fair overall control, especially in the days and weeks running up to the operation. The severity of any large vessel complications, such as heart and other vascular diseases, will also need to be evaluated. Your blood pressure will need to be well controlled, as high blood pressure (hypertension) is a frequent accompaniment to diabetes and can lead to surgical complications if unregulated. Of the small vessel complications of diabetes, your kidney function will need to be evaluated and the result taken into account, as abnormal kidney function can affect blood pressure, lead to retention of intravenous fluids, and alter the rate of removal of certain medications from the body. If you are taking pills and the operation is relatively minor and brief and your diabetes is under good control, not taking your medication on the night prior to and/or the morning of the operation may be all that is needed and the medication can be resumed after surgery, with your first main meal. However, make sure your surgeon is informed about all the medicines you are taking. If you take Metformin, talk to your doctor about stopping it. Sometimes, it can be stopped 48 hours before and 48 hours after surgery to decrease the risk of lactic acidosis. People who are taking insulin will generally be instructed to take a reduced dose of the longer-acting insulin the night prior to surgery and to take no set dose of short-acting insulin after the last meal has been eaten before surgery. Remember to consult your doctor about what dose you should take the night before or the day of your surgery. Surgery is riskier if you have diabetes complications. So talk to your doctor about your diabetes control and any complications you have from diabetes. Tell your doctor about any problems you have with your heart, kidneys, or eyes, or if you have loss of feeling in your feet. The doctor may run some tests to check the status of those problems. Upon arrival at the hospital, the glucose will be monitored frequently by the hospital staff and insulin will be given if you need it. This is especially true for longer and more complicated operations. You or your nurses should check your blood sugar often after the surgery. This might fluctuate because you have trouble eating, are less active, are vomiting, or have some pain or stress from the surgery. Expect that you may take more time to heal because of your diabetes. Watch for signs of infection, such as a fever, or an incision that is red, hot to touch, swollen, more painful, or oozing. It is also important to prevent bedsores. Move around in bed and get out of bed frequently. If you have less feeling in your toes and fingers, you may not feel if you are getting a bed sore. Make sure you move around. After you leave the hospital, it is important for you to work with your primary care team to make sure your blood sugar continues to be well controlled.
The extent to which you and your physician prepare for your operation depends on the extent of the severity of the condition that has led to it, and the treatment that you are taking for your diabetes. The fact that your operation is planned means that it is not urgent nor an emergency. Your diabetes may increase your risk for problems during or after your surgery, such as infection after... (Read More)
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Shachi says

Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout your body. When your diabetes is not controlled (meaning that your blood sugar is too high), sugar builds up in your blood and combines with your hemoglobin, becoming glycated. The average amount of sugar in your blood can be found by measuring your hemoglobin A1c level. Hemoglobin A1c provides an average of your blood sugar control over the past 2 to 3 months and is used along with home blood sugar monitoring to make adjustments in your diabetes medicines. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. Symptoms that indicate the possibility of a high HBA1c are constant hunger, Increased or extreme thirst, increased appetite, weight loss or weight gain, weakness, blurred vision, tingling, and infection, increased fatigue, increased or frequent urination, fruity odor or breath, sores that do not heal, and in some cases no such symptoms can be seen.
Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout your body. When your diabetes is not controlled (meaning that your blood sugar is too high), sugar builds up in your blood and combines with your hemoglobin, becoming glycated. The average amount of sugar in your blood can be found by measuring your hemoglobin A1c level. Hemoglobin A1c provides an average of your blood sugar... (Read More)
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Shachi says

Yes, there is a connection between frozen shoulder and diabetes. It is one of the five musculoskeletal complications that can affect people with diabetes. Frozen shoulder formally called adhesive capsulitis, it leads to pain at the tip of the shoulder and restricted movement because of fibrosis. It has nothing to do with the weather and everything to do with the ligaments in your shoulder. Collagen is a major building block in the ligaments that hold the bones together in a joint. A high blood sugar level leads sugar molecules attach to the collagen and making it sticky. The collagen fibers then stick together and limit the capacity for the joint and ligaments to stretch with movement. It causes extreme pain and stiffness in the shoulder joint and eventually leads to immobility. This is followed by a long period of thawing in which the shoulder slowly returns to normal. Frozen shoulder is estimated to affect about 20% of people with diabetes. Several drugs are being developed for the treatment of frozen shoulder. You should use stretching, anti-inflammatory drugs, injections of local steroids and anesthetic agents judiciously.
Yes, there is a connection between frozen shoulder and diabetes. It is one of the five musculoskeletal complications that can affect people with diabetes. Frozen shoulder formally called adhesive capsulitis, it leads to pain at the tip of the shoulder and restricted movement because of fibrosis. It has nothing to do with the weather and everything to do with the ligaments in your shoulder.... (Read More)
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Neha says

Person with diabetes should always keep glucose along with biscuits or fruit with them. Patients should be educated regarding spacing of meals and the importance of snacks in between the three main meals. As soon as the mild symptoms of hypo are experienced, he or she should have something to eat. In case of severe symptoms, he should consume three teaspoons of glucose followed by other foods like brown bread/ biscuit/fruit juice/roti etc. It is important to test Blood glucose if possible and re test in 15 min and retreat the low sugars if they persist. The cause should be assessed and patient should be educated to prevent recurrence. It’s usually the normal practice that the patients are given chocolates or banana. There is a chance of choking and hence patients and care takers need to be educated to avoid such practices. Additionally- It is always beneficial for diabetic patients to carry diabetic ID cards. Diabetic patients, immediate family members and in case of especially type I diabetic children, teachers, friends should be educated regarding hypoglycemia management.
Person with diabetes should always keep glucose along with biscuits or fruit with them. Patients should be educated regarding spacing of meals and the importance of snacks in between the three main meals. As soon as the mild symptoms of hypo are experienced, he or she should have something to eat. In case of severe symptoms, he should consume three teaspoons of glucose followed by other foods... (Read More)
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Dr. Madhu says

This is a valid concern for all parents who have a child with Type 1 diabetes. Lots of children with Type 1 diabetes have hypoglycemic conditions while sleeping at night. The symptoms are mild and the child may not wake up. This can become a severe condition if blood glucose levels drop further. Look for signs of hypoglycemia which include: Ø Cold skin Ø Fast breath Ø Tremors Ø Dry skin Ø Profuse sweating Ø Frequent moving while sleeping etc
This is a valid concern for all parents who have a child with Type 1 diabetes. Lots of children with Type 1 diabetes have hypoglycemic conditions while sleeping at night. The symptoms are mild and the child may not wake up. This can become a severe condition if blood glucose levels drop further. Look for signs of hypoglycemia which include: Ø Cold skin Ø Fast breath Ø Tremors Ø Dry skin Ø... (Read More)
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