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Shachi says

Learning that your child has diabetes is difficult. Figuring out how to explain diabetes to your child may seem even more so. Here are some tips from, to help you: a) Be honest and open. Always tell the truth, even when it is difficult. b) Encourage your child to ask questions and keep an open dialogue. c) Keep it age appropriate – A young child doesn’t need the same kind of detail that you would tell a teenager. d) Make sure you use language that best fits your child’s age and readiness. Younger children especially need to hear that they did not do anything that caused them to have diabetes. It is not their fault! e) Explain the disease – Tell your child that diabetes will not go away, like a cold. f) Also, some children think they will die from diabetes assure them that this is not the case! g) It’s ok to be upset – Let your child know that it’s normal to be upset about having diabetes. Encourage your child to talk about their feelings. h) Be positive – It is important that your child knows and believes that he can do the same things as a child without diabetes. You can get diabetes under control and live a normal, healthy life.
Learning that your child has diabetes is difficult. Figuring out how to explain diabetes to your child may seem even more so. Here are some tips from, to help you: a) Be honest and open. Always tell the truth, even when it is difficult. b) Encourage your child to ask questions and keep an open dialogue. c) Keep it age appropriate – A young child doesn’t need the same kind of detail that you... (Read More)
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Shachi says

It is difficult for any parent that their child has been but it is important to realize that your child can easily live a healthy and fulfilling life. What Goes Wrong The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was made because your child’s level of glucose (sugar) in the blood was above normal. Insulin is not being produced. Insulin is essential to escort the glucose from the foods we eat into cells of the body where it is critically needed to function properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. In type 1 diabetes the pancreas loses all ability to produce insulin. The islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are gradually all destroyed. Injections of insulin or an insulin pump are then critical for survival Why Not an Insulin Pill? Insulin can’t be given orally because it is a protein and gets digested in the stomach is digested instead of getting into the bloodstream where it is needed. Insulin comes in a variety of preparations that differ according to how fast it takes effect, when that effect is the greatest, and how long it continues to work in the body .Living With Diabetes Humans have an extraordinary ability to adapt. I can assure you that what seems tough now will soon become routine. One of the first hurdles to get over is that to help your child is to prick him or her with a needle. Injecting cold insulin is more uncomfortable, so removing the unopened insulin from the refrigerator long enough in advance before use so that it is at room temperature when you need to use it is a good idea. Use raw needles and shift the injection site, and this activity will soon get easier for all involved. There are new devices as well as some in development that make blood glucose testing and insulin injections less painful, easier and more precise. You might be concerned about how diabetes will affect your kid's childhood. What may surprise you to learn is that kids with diabetes can do everything regular kids do and live a normal, active life just with a little bit of care and planning. As a renowned diabetes educator stated “Children with diabetes should be able to do all of the activities that they would have done if they were not diagnosed with diabetes. It is our job as healthcare providers to adjust your child’s diabetes management plan around your child’s daily routine.” A common misconception is that kids with diabetes can’t eat anything with sugar, including things like birthday cake, cookies, and ice cream. The truth is that kids can eat these foods in moderation; they just need to carefully plan what else they eat that day and adjust insulin doses accordingly. A healthy meal plan for a child with diabetes is actually the same for a child without diabetes. After talking to the doctor learning the routine of glucose testing, planned eating, and insulin, children can also play sports and take part in physical activities just like other children. Of course, children, can’t, and shouldn’t, be dealing with their diabetes alone. Diabetes affects the whole family, and it’s very important that all members of the family take an active role in your child’s diabetes. Experts say that One of the most important things parents can do to help their child with their diabetes is to continue to stay involved with day to day management tasks and find ways to work together as a team with your child. It may seem overwhelming now, but diabetes care will quickly become part of your child’s everyday routine.
It is difficult for any parent that their child has been but it is important to realize that your child can easily live a healthy and fulfilling life. What Goes Wrong The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was made because your child’s level of glucose (sugar) in the blood was above normal. Insulin is not being produced. Insulin is essential to escort the glucose from the foods we eat into cells of... (Read More)
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Shachi says

Unfortunately, there is no known cure for diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period", usually shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period," diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months. Some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. However, it would be a mistake to assume that diabetes has been permanently cured. The honeymoon period happens because type 1 diabetes is diagnosed when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed, which means there still are a few cells remaining. At the time of diagnosis most patients still, are producing some insulin which may temporarily meet the body insulin needs. This may happen even after obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness. Once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease and be met by the remaining cells. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. There is some evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may discover their blood glucose returns to normal, especially if they lose weight, have a healthy diet and/or balance it with physical activity. Does this mean diabetes has disappeared? No. The development of type 2 diabetes is a gradual process, too, in which the body becomes unable to produce enough insulin for its needs and/or the body's cells become resistant to insulin's effects. Gradually the patient goes from having "impaired glucose tolerance" — a decreased but still adequate ability to convert food into energy — to having "diabetes." If the patient were to gain weight back or scale back on their physical activity program, high blood glucose would return. If they were to overeat at a meal, their blood glucose probably would continue to go higher than someone without diabetes. Also, the decreased insulin production and/or increased insulin resistance that led to the initial diabetes diagnosis will gradually intensify over the years and during periods of stress. In time, the patient who could maintain normal blood glucose with diet and exercise alone may discover that he or she needs to add oral diabetes medications — or perhaps even insulin injections — to keep blood glucose in a healthy range. The good news for a type 1 and type 2 patient is that if insulin, medication, weight loss, physical activity and changes in eating result in normal blood glucose, that means their diabetes is well controlled and their risk of developing diabetes complications is much lower. But it doesn't mean that their diabetes has gone away.
Unfortunately, there is no known cure for diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period", usually shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period," diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months. Some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little... (Read More)
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Neha says

Person with diabetes should always keep glucose along with biscuits or fruit with them. Patients should be educated regarding spacing of meals and the importance of snacks in between the three main meals. As soon as the mild symptoms of hypo are experienced, he or she should have something to eat. In case of severe symptoms, he should consume three teaspoons of glucose followed by other foods like brown bread/ biscuit/fruit juice/roti etc. It is important to test Blood glucose if possible and re test in 15 min and retreat the low sugars if they persist. The cause should be assessed and patient should be educated to prevent recurrence. It’s usually the normal practice that the patients are given chocolates or banana. There is a chance of choking and hence patients and care takers need to be educated to avoid such practices. Additionally- It is always beneficial for diabetic patients to carry diabetic ID cards. Diabetic patients, immediate family members and in case of especially type I diabetic children, teachers, friends should be educated regarding hypoglycemia management.
Person with diabetes should always keep glucose along with biscuits or fruit with them. Patients should be educated regarding spacing of meals and the importance of snacks in between the three main meals. As soon as the mild symptoms of hypo are experienced, he or she should have something to eat. In case of severe symptoms, he should consume three teaspoons of glucose followed by other foods... (Read More)
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Shachi says

No, it,s not true and the answer is not so simple. The belief that eating too much sugar causes diabetes is one of the most common misconceptions around diabetes, and has been declared untrue by the American Diabetes Association and many other scientific bodies.Sugar is a natural nutrient needed by the body to produce energy and derived from different types of carbohydrates (including sugar, fruit, vegetables, grains and starches). In a healthy body the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin which helps to deliver the sugar (or glucose) to your cells, providing your body with energy. When a person develops diabetes, the pancreas stops producing enough insulin, resulting in the glucose building up in the blood instead of moving into the cells. There are three main types of diabetes. None of them are caused by too much sugar, but rather by the pancreas which does not work as it should.Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease; type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin, the insulin does not work properly, or both. It is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors and can happen in a person of any age. Eating a diet high in kilojoules, whether from fat or sugar, can cause you to become overweight which increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes.The American Diabetes Association recommends that people should avoid intake of sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes. Sugar-sweetened beverages include beverages like:regular soda, fruit drink, energy drinks,other sugary drinks.These will raise blood glucose and can provide several hundred calories in just one serving.A third type of diabetes, gestational diabetes, occurs during pregnancy when hormone changes prevent insulin from working properly. Women with gestational diabetes usually need to take insulin and the condition may resolve after birth of the child.
No, it,s not true and the answer is not so simple. The belief that eating too much sugar causes diabetes is one of the most common misconceptions around diabetes, and has been declared untrue by the American Diabetes Association and many other scientific bodies.Sugar is a natural nutrient needed by the body to produce energy and derived from different types of carbohydrates (including sugar,... (Read More)
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