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Sarla Roy   
Doctor

Questions asked by you

It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Gestational Diabetes is a condition in which pregnant females get high blood glucose levels. It is caused by improper insulin responses. During pregnancy, the placenta - the organ that feeds and delivers oxygen to your baby -- releases hormones that help your baby grow. Some of these hormones interfere with mother's insulin and prevent it from functioning properly, thus leading to a rise in blood glucose levels.
Doctors theorize that genetic predisposition, environmental issues (such as obesity prior to pregnancy), and/or behavioral factors (such as diet and exercise habits) may contribute. Although the condition can strike any pregnant woman, there are several risk factors that could increase your chances of developing this disease if:
- You were overweight before you got pregnant and you are gaining weight very quickly during your pregnancy. Extra weight makes it harder for your body to use insulin.
- You have a family history of diabetes (parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes)
- You had pre-diabetes before pregnancy (blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes)
- You had gestational diabetes during a past pregnancy
- You have a history of unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth
- You are over the age of 25
- You gave birth to a baby weighing more than 4kg
- You have a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
- You have high blood pressure

Jaggery contains sucrose and fructose in equal portions; as you know, sucrose metabolises to glucose rapidly on ingestion and can alter blood sugar levels, not a good thing for a diabetic. Fructose does not affect blood sugar levels but the sucrose can. So unless it cannot be resisted at all, avoiding jaggery would be a good idea for a diabetic. Then again it depends on how often you eat jaggery. If it is a rare and not extravagant indulgence I am sure the body can cope with the increased glucose load that day.

Sure you can.But in limited amounts.Diabetics are prone to renal diseases.Eating high amount of animal foods can put your kidneys under unwanted pressure.There is a thing which we call as protein ratio.There is a thing which we call as protein ratio.Now suppose you eat 100gm protein/day. 50gm comes from veg. foods and 50from non veg. This will get your protein ratio to 1:1.if you want to eat non veg. Your goal should be to bring this veg:nonveg. ratio to 3:1.Animal proteins are never ever fully digested by our body and result in waste products which are to be excreted by our kidneys.

Insulin is started in people with type 2 diabetes in the following conditions: Short-term insulin therapy is required in people with type 2 diabetes who have HbA1c of 9% or above and are symptomatic. It is seen that it helps in achieving better sugar control. · Long-term insulin is required when most of the beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed and hence are unable to produce insulin. · During pregnancy · During and after a major surgery · Recurrent and serious infections like pneumonia.

It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Gestational Diabetes is a condition in which pregnant females get high blood glucose levels. It is caused by improper insulin responses. During pregnancy, the placenta - the organ that feeds and delivers oxygen to your baby -- releases hormones that help your baby grow. Some of these hormones interfere with mother's insulin and prevent it from functioning properly, thus leading to a rise in blood glucose levels.
Doctors theorize that genetic predisposition, environmental issues (such as obesity prior to pregnancy), and/or behavioral factors (such as diet and exercise habits) may contribute. Although the condition can strike any pregnant woman, there are several risk factors that could increase your chances of developing this disease if:
- You were overweight before you got pregnant and you are gaining weight very quickly during your pregnancy. Extra weight makes it harder for your body to use insulin.
- You have a family history of diabetes (parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes)
- You had pre-diabetes before pregnancy (blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes)
- You had gestational diabetes during a past pregnancy
- You have a history of unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth
- You are over the age of 25
- You gave birth to a baby weighing more than 4kg
- You have a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
- You have high blood pressure

Jaggery contains sucrose and fructose in equal portions; as you know, sucrose metabolises to glucose rapidly on ingestion and can alter blood sugar levels, not a good thing for a diabetic. Fructose does not affect blood sugar levels but the sucrose can. So unless it cannot be resisted at all, avoiding jaggery would be a good idea for a diabetic. Then again it depends on how often you eat jaggery. If it is a rare and not extravagant indulgence I am sure the body can cope with the increased glucose load that day.

Sure you can.But in limited amounts.Diabetics are prone to renal diseases.Eating high amount of animal foods can put your kidneys under unwanted pressure.There is a thing which we call as protein ratio.There is a thing which we call as protein ratio.Now suppose you eat 100gm protein/day. 50gm comes from veg. foods and 50from non veg. This will get your protein ratio to 1:1.if you want to eat non veg. Your goal should be to bring this veg:nonveg. ratio to 3:1.Animal proteins are never ever fully digested by our body and result in waste products which are to be excreted by our kidneys.

Insulin is started in people with type 2 diabetes in the following conditions: Short-term insulin therapy is required in people with type 2 diabetes who have HbA1c of 9% or above and are symptomatic. It is seen that it helps in achieving better sugar control. · Long-term insulin is required when most of the beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed and hence are unable to produce insulin. · During pregnancy · During and after a major surgery · Recurrent and serious infections like pneumonia.